August 18

A Response to Emilee Danielson

Original Post

I want to say, first, that I am the parent of a transgendered adolescent. I support my child fully in their identity. Now, on to the subject of your rant.

Throughout your entire piece, you have very little positive to say about being a woman. You talk about the pain of being a woman. You talk about the fear of being a woman. You talk about the depression of being a woman who is trapped by their hormones, over and over again, and relate that as your experience.

You talk about the uniquely heteronormative experience of losing one’s husband (because, of course, a woman is nothing without her man). You speak of finding value only in what one’s family thinks of one, and, then, only if one has a husband and children.

You write off Ms. Jenner’s experience because you truly  do not understand it, and, while dismissing her as being not a woman and repeatedly misgendering her, you have nothing good to say about your own experience being a woman.

You may rant and rave about how Ms. Jenner does not fit your definition of what it means to be a woman, but from my perspective, all you seem to be able to hang on to is the worst and most negative aspects of that experience. You do not talk about the connection you feel to nature, as you are endowed with the ability to nurture life within you. You speak nothing of the joy of seeing your newborn child for the first time. You did not touch on culture not shaming you for being in touch with your emotions, or being able to cry without feeling ashamed of yourself. You didn’t mention being able to have close, emotional relationships with other women without being worried that others would label you as being homosexual, or, if you were homosexual, giving yourself away through those close relationships.

You also did not bring up a legal system that has long been on your gender’s side in the great majority of custody disputes. You did not admit that if a woman is raped or is the victim of domestic violence, she can go to the police, and, more often than not, get something in the way of justice, protection, and find many support groups to help.

Seeing as that you are fifty, I can understand that you grew up in a world of clearly defined genders, gender roles, and strict guidelines on behavior, and probably parents who bemoaned the changes that were happening to those definitions. Under the surface, those clear definitions were an illusion. There were people who were not heterosexual, there were people who did not, at their core, feel like the gender they were assigned at birth. When you were growing up, though, those things that had been denied and hidden were coming to light, and people were feeling more and more free to be who they were.

Yes, there are differences between the genders. But, can you imagine waking up every single morning, hating the very body that you are in, feeling betrayed by the flesh you inhabit? That your breasts and vagina were completely wrong and that they should not belong to you?

Can you even begin to imagine what it must be like to be constantly reminded every moment of every day that every aspect of your physical being seems to have betrayed you? Kind of like puberty, but permanent, never ending, and always there?

You talk about how horrible it is to be a woman. Can you imagine being a woman, trapped inside a man’s body, as if you had been dumped without resources on a strange planet and were expected to survive?

You may take offense at Ms. Jenner all you wish. I find your attitude towards those that are transgendered to be much more offensive, and your misogyny to be quite stomach turning.

 

January 15

Funny arguments of the week

Crosseyed
Ever get the feeling that your opponent in a battle of wits is a little less than armed?

Some of you who know me personally know that I tend to like to argue. While, in my early life, this led to a lot of stress, tension, and headaches for my parents, as an adult, I eventually learned to channel my natural impulses to debate into a more constructive (or, at least, a bit less destructive) use on the Internet.

No, seriously. Arguing on the Internet is a good outlet for me. I found that I argue less with my wife and kids, less with my parents (well, unless it is online, but that is another issue), and less with my ex-wife.

Sometimes, it can be a bit humorous. For the past five years or so, I was an admin on a Facebook debate group about religion and atheism.

But, a few months ago, the group was deleted by Facebook for [reasons]. Oh well. At that point, I decided to try and wean myself off of the debates. I felt a sense of loss, sure, but I felt it was time. I had better things to do with my time, like working on my webcomic, Fred the Dot.

But, I missed it. Rather than get as deeply into it as I had been, I decided to limit myself. A group here, a debate there. Well, one area I started dipping my toe into was Youtube debate.

The first thing that comes to mind is the quote from Episode IV. A hive of scum and villainy. Even so, it has been oddly satisfying.

Recently, I got into a heated debate on a video regarding the portrayal of the LGBT community in games. It devolved into a discussion of how HIV spread. This individual was somehow convinced that HIV and other STIs were caused by (wait for it…) feces, and that anal sex was the cause of it, not just the transmission route. After he launched into insults and the like, I showed him an explanation of how one got HIV from the same website he had been using for his argument against homosexual men.

During the same series of discussions, I had people try to convince me that I worshiped Satan, that each generation could determine meanings for words at their discretion (to which I responded with current slang, and the person got pissed off because he thought I was using nonsense, made up words), and some of the stereotypical lame arguments against homosexuality. What I do with my private parts is none of your damn business (unless a being is involved that does not legally consent), and vice versa, and that is how I feel about everyone.

But, in the end, I realized that it is ultimately not satisfying. Imagine in a game that when you beat the final boss, the boss just stops moving and sits there. That is what it is like to argue online. So, no more. I’m moving on.

Currently in my Steam Library, I have 149 games. Some of them I have never even played. So, I will be playing and reviewing each and every one, one game a week, from now on, posting my progress here. I may even post videos. Who knows! We shall see. Super fun awesome game time!